5 Authors to Read If You Love Jane Austen

Jane Austen is one of the best loved authors in the world. Her books have been read, and re-read for generations; and for good reason. No one does it quite like Jane, but sadly her list of works is slightly on the short side. And, let’s face it…there’s only so many times you can re-read Pride & Prejudice! So, when you’re craving some Jane Austen, but want something new, here are five authors to give a try. Read more

The Making of A Marchioness- Frances Hodgson-Burnett

the making of a marchioness

Hands up if you thought Frances Hodgson-Burnett only wrote for children? I know I did until I came across this book recently. Growing up I loved “A Little Princess” and “The Secret Garden” only a little less than I loved the film versions! But despite that I gave little thought to their author, and certainly assumed that she just wrote for children. What I have come to realise recently, however, is that books like “The Secret Garden” were just a side-line to her real career as an adult author- in fact, in her own lifetime it was “The Making of a Marchioness” that she was most famous for. So when I saw her name amongst the usual bunch of classic authors I was curious and when I found out that the company that publishes her (Persephone Classics) specialises in ‘Forgotten Twentieth Century authors- mostly women’ I actually got a little bit excited. You’ll have to allow me this little nerd moment, you see I have a real soft spot of ‘forgotten authors- mostly women’. My main focus at University was Eighteenth Century women’s writing. I love it, it’s why I started this blog, and to find out that it wasn’t just my little class of four students who appreciated the importance of women’s contribution to writing…well let’s just say I may have made a noise more commonly associated with the fans of Harry Styles!

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Review: Evelina by Frances Burney

 

Evelina by Frances Burney is written by one of Jane Austen’s favourite authors. In fact, it was Frances Burney who provided the inspiration for Pride and Prejudice. Her epistolary style transports the reader into the late eighteenth century society as we follow to progress of the eponymous heroine, Evelina. Read more